Crumbling Pipes and Underground Waste: A Glimpse at Our Ailing Sewer System

As clean water regulations become tougher and sewer systems and water treatment plants become outdated, cities are struggling to stay compliant and safe. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien goes underground to discover the many ways America's sewer systems could be revamped to conserve water and save money. Read more at PBS.org.


Industry: $1 trillion needed to replace water lines

A new report by the American Water Works Association, which is funded by the nation's water utilities, estimates $1 trillion is needed over the next 25 years to replace water systems that are coming to the end of their useful lives. Read more...


Broken water mains raise questions about aging infrastructure

Recent water main breaks that released millions of gallons of water onto streets in Duluth and Minneapolis have focused attention on aging underground pipes that are common in other cities as well. Read more...


Aging Water Infrastructure

Aging water infrastructure is one of our Nation's top water priorities. EPA research is focusing on increasing the life of drinking water and wastewater systems, determining the causes of system failures and finding ways to prevent future breakdowns. Read more...


Buried No Longer: Confronting America’s Water infrastructure Challenge

A new kind of challenge is emerging in the United States, one that for many years was largely buried in our national consciousness. Now it can be buried no longer. Much of our drinking water infrastructure, the more than one million miles of pipes beneath our streets, is nearing the end of its useful life and approaching the age at which it needs to be replaced. Moreover, our shifting population brings significant growth to some areas of the country, requiring larger pipe networks to provide water service.
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Infrastructure improvements are essential for more than improved water quality and supply.

We've heard the need-based estimates time and time again: Annual capital investment in water infrastructure is approximately $36.4 billion, but to meet the needs of our population growth that annual investment must increase to $91 billion. With "just" an additional $9.4 billion per year during the next eight years, we would avoid $21 billion per year in costs to households and business. Read more...


Indictments issued over '07 Georgetown plant deaths

Xcel Energy, Public Service Company of Colorado and RPI Coating Inc. have been indicted by the federal grand jury in Denver on allegations that violations of workplace safety and health rules led to the deaths of five men at the Cabin Creek hydro-electric generating station near Georgetown in October 2007. Read more...


U.S. Chemical Safety Board Begins Preliminary Investigation of Fatal Hydroelectric Plant Fire in Georgetown, Colorado

Media reports indicate the fatally injured workers became trapped deep underground when a fire ignited during an operation to coat the inside of a four foot diameter pipe with epoxy. According to those reports, the underground pipe is several thousand feet long and connects a reservoir with electricity-generating turbines. Read more...